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  • Voters Say They’re More Socially Liberal, More Fiscally Conservative

    Voters tend to believe the body politic is becoming more liberal on social issues but still leans conservative in fiscal areas.

    A new Rasmussen Reports national telephone and online survey finds that 41% of Likely U.S. Voters think voters in general are becoming more liberal on social issues like abortion, public prayer and church-state topics. Twenty-seven percent (27%) say voters are becoming more socially conservative, while 25% believe their views in these areas are remaining about the same. (To see survey question wording, click here.)

    (Want a free daily email update? If it's in the news, it's in our polls). Rasmussen Reports updates are also available on Twitter or Facebook.

    The survey of 1,000 Likely Voters was conducted on July 24-25, 2017 by Rasmussen Reports. The margin of sampling error is +/- 3 percentage points with a 95% level of confidence. Field work for all Rasmussen Reports surveys is conducted by Pulse Opinion Research, LLC. See methodology.

  • Daily Presidential Tracking Poll

    The Rasmussen Reports daily Presidential Tracking Poll for Thursday shows that 41% of Likely U.S. Voters approve of President Trump’s job performance. Fifty-nine percent (59%) disapprove.

    The latest figures for Trump include 25% who Strongly Approve of the way Trump is performing and 49% who Strongly Disapprove. This gives him a Presidential Approval Index rating of -24. (see trends).

    Regular updates are posted Monday through Friday at 9:30 a.m. Eastern (sign up for free daily email update).

  • Voters See Republicans As Bigger Roadblock Than Democrats For Trump

    Voters are now more likely to believe Republicans in Congress are the bigger problem for President Trump than Democrats are.

    A new Rasmussen Reports national telephone and online survey finds that 43% of Likely U.S. Voters believe congressional Republicans are a bigger problem for the president, while 36% believe Democrats are the bigger problem. A sizable 22% are undecided. (To see survey question wording, click here.)

    (Want a free daily email update? If it's in the news, it's in our polls). Rasmussen Reports updates are also available on Twitter or Facebook.

    The survey of 1,000 Likely Voters was conducted on July 20 & 23, 2017 by Rasmussen Reports. The margin of sampling error is +/- 3 percentage points with a 95% level of confidence. Field work for all Rasmussen Reports surveys is conducted by Pulse Opinion Research, LLC. See methodology.

  • Voters Think Media Has Too Much Influence Over Government

    Senator John McCain told the U.S. Senate yesterday ahead of the health care vote to tune out media personalities and trust one another instead. Voters think that's a good idea.

    A new Rasmussen Reports national telephone and online survey finds that 50% of Likely U.S. Voters believe the media has too much power and influence over government decisions. This belief has fluctuated from a high of 67% to a previous low of 54% in surveys since 2010. (To see survey question wording, click here.)

    (Want a free daily email update? If it's in the news, it's in our polls).  Rasmussen Reports updates are also available on Twitter or Facebook.

    The survey of 1,000 Likely Voters was conducted on July 20 & 23, 2017 by Rasmussen Reports. The margin of sampling error is +/- 3 percentage points with a 95% level of confidence. Field work for all Rasmussen Reports surveys is conducted by Pulse Opinion Research, LLC. See methodology.

  • Voters See Economic Sanctions As An Effective Response

    As Congress mulls slapping additional economic sanctions on America’s foes, voters tend to agree that sanctions work and make this country safer.

    The latest Rasmussen Reports national telephone and online survey finds that 52% of Likely U.S. Voters believe, generally speaking, that economic sanctions against a country are an effective way to make it change policies that the United States does not approve of. Only 22% disagree, but a sizable 26% are not sure. (To see survey question wording, click here.)

    (Want a free daily e-mail update? If it's in the news, it's in our polls). Rasmussen Reports updates are also available on Twitter or Facebook.

    The survey of 1,000 Likely Voters was conducted on July 24-25, 2017 by Rasmussen Reports. The margin of sampling error is +/- 3 percentage points with a 95% level of confidence. Field work for all Rasmussen Reports surveys is conducted by Pulse Opinion Research, LLC. See methodology.

  • Most Republicans Still More Aligned With Trump Than With GOP Congress

    Over six months into the Trump presidency, Republican voters still say they relate more to the president’s political views than those of their party's representatives in Congress.

    A new Rasmussen Reports national telephone and online survey finds that 45% of Likely U.S. Voters say that when it comes to major issues facing the nation, their views are closest to Republicans in Washington, including 33% who are more aligned with Trump and just 12% who relate more to the average Republican in Congress. Forty-four percent (44%) of all voters say their views are more closely aligned with the average congressional Democrat when it comes to major issues facing the nation. Twelve percent (12%) are not sure. (To see survey question wording, click here.)

    (Want a free daily email update? If it's in the news, it's in our polls). Rasmussen Reports updates are also available on Twitter or Facebook.

    The survey of 1,000 Likely Voters was conducted on July 20 & 23, 2017 by Rasmussen Reports. The margin of sampling error is +/- 3 percentage points with a 95% level of confidence. Field work for all Rasmussen Reports surveys is conducted by Pulse Opinion Research, LLC. See methodology.

  • Republicans, Democrats Losing Faith In Their Congressional Leaders

    Republican voters appear to have lost the enthusiasm they showed earlier this year about their Congressional leaders, and now Democrats are following suit.

    A new Rasmussen Reports national telephone and online survey finds that 67% of Likely Republican Voters now believe Republicans in Congress have lost touch with GOP voters throughout the nation over the past several years. That’s up from 51% in February, just weeks into the new Congress. Still, the latest finding remains below the high of 76% measured in early 2016.

    Just 25% of Republicans now think their representatives have done a good job representing the party’s values, down from 40% in the previous survey but more consistent with earlier polling. (To see survey question wording, click here.)

    (Want a free daily e-mail update? If it's in the news, it's in our polls). Rasmussen Reports updates are also available on Twitter or Facebook.

    The survey of 1,000 Likely Voters was conducted on July 20 and 23, 2017 by Rasmussen Reports. The margin of sampling error is +/- 3 percentage points with a 95% level of confidence. Field work for all Rasmussen Reports surveys is conducted by Pulse Opinion Research, LLC. See methodology.

  • AG Sessions More Popular Than Obama's Holder, Lynch

    President Trump last week called Attorney General Jeff Sessions “beleaguered” and said he would have picked someone else if he knew Sessions would recuse himself from the Russia investigation. Voters see Sessions more favorably than either of President Obama's attorneys general but not by much.

    Thirty-seven percent (37%) of Likely U.S. Voters have a favorable opinion of Sessions, according to a new Rasmussen Reports national telephone and online survey. Forty-seven percent (47%) view the former Alabama attorney general and U.S. senator unfavorably. This includes 14% with a Very Favorable opinion and 28% with a Very Unfavorable one. (To see survey question wording, click here.)

    (Want a free daily email update? If it's in the news, it's in our polls). Rasmussen Reports updates are also available on Twitter or Facebook.

    The survey of 1,000 Likely U.S. Voters was conducted on July 20 & 23, 2017 by Rasmussen Reports. The margin of sampling error is +/- 3 percentage points with a 95% level of confidence. Field work for all Rasmussen Reports surveys is conducted by Pulse Opinion Research, LLC. See methodology.

  • 33% Say U.S. Heading in Right Direction

    Thirty-three percent (33%) of Likely U.S. Voters think the country is heading in the right direction, according to a new Rasmussen Reports national telephone and online survey for the week ending July 20.  

    (Want a free daily e-mail update? If it's in the news, it's in our polls). Rasmussen Reports updates are also available on Twitter or Facebook.

    The national telephone survey of 2,500 Likely Voters was conducted by Rasmussen Reports from July 16-20, 2017. The margin of sampling error for the survey is +/- 2 percentage points with a 95% level of confidence. Field work for all Rasmussen Reports surveys is conducted by Pulse Opinion Research, LLC. See methodology.

  • 55% Say Congress More Responsive to Media Than to Voters

    Most voters think Congress doesn’t listen to them and is more interested in making the media happy.

    The latest Rasmussen Reports national telephone and online survey finds that 55% of Likely U.S. Voters believe what the media thinks matters more to the average member of Congress than what voters think. Still, that’s an improvement from 62% who felt that way in October 2009 during President Obama’s first year in office.  Just 30% say the average member cares more what voters think. Fifteen percent (15%) are undecided. (To see survey question wording, click here.)

    (Want a free daily e-mail update? If it's in the news, it's in our polls). Rasmussen Reports updates are also available on Twitter or Facebook.

    The survey of 1,000 Likely Voters was conducted on July 20 & 23, 2017 by Rasmussen Reports. The margin of sampling error is +/- 3 percentage points with a 95% level of confidence. Field work for all Rasmussen Reports surveys is conducted by Pulse Opinion Research, LLC. See methodology.