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Category » Politics

MOST RECENT RELEASES

  • What They Told Us: Reviewing Last Week’s Key Polls

    President Trump closed the week with his highest favorability rating since mid-June of last year while the finger-pointing continues over the latest school massacre.

  • Daily Presidential Tracking Poll

    The Rasmussen Reports daily Presidential Tracking Poll for Friday shows that 50% of Likely U.S. Voters approve of President Trump’s job performance. Forty-nine percent (49%) disapprove.

    This is the president’s highest job approval rating since mid-June of last year. President Obama earned 45% approval on this date in the second year of his presidency.

    The latest figures include 34% who Strongly Approve of the way the president is performing and 41% who Strongly Disapprove. This gives him a Presidential Approval Index rating of -7. (see trends). 

    Regular updates are posted Monday through Friday at 9:30 a.m. Eastern (sign up for free daily email update).

    Now that Gallup has quit the field, Rasmussen Reports is the only nationally recognized public opinion firm that still tracks President Trump's job approval ratings on a daily basis. If your organization is interested in a weekly or longer sponsorship of Rasmussen Reports' Daily Presidential Tracking Poll,  please send e-mail to beth@rasmussenreports.com.

  • Half Agree Russia Is Likely Election Meddler But Say U.S. Does, Too

    Now that Special Counsel Robert Mueller’s Russia probe has resulted in 13 indictments against Russians for meddling in the 2016 presidential election, half of voters think it’s possible this alleged interference cost Hillary Clinton the presidency. But slightly more think the U.S. government also interferes in the elections of other countries.

    (Want a free daily e-mail update? If it's in the news, it's in our polls).  Rasmussen Reports updates are also available on Twitter or Facebook.

    The national survey of 1,000 Likely Voters was conducted on February 19-20, 2018 by Rasmussen Reports. The margin of sampling error is +/- 3 percentage points with a 95% level of confidence. Field work for all Rasmussen Reports surveys is conducted by Pulse Opinion Research, LLC. See methodology.

  • Social Media Users Say Sites Don’t Influence Their Politics

    Last Friday, Robert Mueller’s special investigation handed over indictments against 13 Russians for meddling in the 2016 election by using stolen identities from American citizens to promote mostly pro-Trump political activist campaigns through social media. Though most voters are avid users of social media,  few say they’re influenced  by political posts on platforms like Twitter and Facebook.

    A new Rasmussen Reports national telephone and online survey finds that 71% of Likely U.S. Voters say they use social media like Facebook and Twitter at least a few times a week. That includes 42% who use them every day and 16% who do so nearly every day. Another eight percent (8%) say they go on such sites every now and then. Twenty-one percent (21%) say they rarely or never use social media. (To see survey question wording, click here.)

    (Want a free daily e-mail update? If it's in the news, it's in our polls).  Rasmussen Reports updates are also available on Twitter or Facebook.

    The national survey of 1,000 Likely Voters was conducted on February 19-20, 2018 by Rasmussen Reports. The margin of sampling error is +/- 3 percentage points with a 95% level of confidence. Field work for all Rasmussen Reports surveys is conducted by Pulse Opinion Research, LLC. See methodology.

  • Americans Aren’t Convinced Stricter Gun Control Laws Will Decrease Violent Crime

    In the wake of a school shooting in Parkland, Florida, that left 17 dead, officials and activists are calling for tighter gun control laws. But Americans aren’t convinced stricter gun laws will reduce crime and don’t trust the government to enforce those laws.

    A new Rasmussen Reports national telephone and online survey finds that 15% of American Adults say stricter gun control laws increase violent crime, while 39% think stricter laws would decrease violent crime. Another 39% believe beefing up the country’s gun control laws would have no impact on violent crime. (To see survey question wording, click here.)

    (Want a free daily e-mail update? If it's in the news, it's in our polls). Rasmussen Reports updates are also available on Twitter or Facebook.

    The survey of 1,000 American Adults was conducted on February 19-20, 2018 by Rasmussen Reports. The margin of sampling error is +/- 3 percentage points with a 95% level of confidence. Field work for all Rasmussen Reports surveys is conducted by Pulse Opinion Research, LLC. See methodology.

  • Is POTUS Most Powerful?

    Voters think the president of the United States holds the right amount of power, though they’re not sure if that makes him the most powerful person in the world.

    A new Rasmussen Reports national telephone and online survey finds that 34% of Likely U.S. Voters think the president of the United States has too much power, while 12% think the president does not have enough power. Nearly half (47%) of voters think the president holds about the right amount of power. (To see survey question wording, click here.)

    (Want a free daily e-mail update? If it's in the news, it's in our polls). Rasmussen Reports updates are also available on or Facebook.

    The survey of 1,000 Likely Voters was conducted on February 15 & 18, 2018 by Rasmussen Reports. The margin of sampling error is +/- 3 percentage points with a 95% level of confidence. Field work for all Rasmussen Reports surveys is conducted by Pulse Opinion Research, LLC. See methodology.

  • Voters Blame Politicians for Federal Deficit

    Voters think it’s important to consider spending cuts across the board to reduce the federal budget, but they think it’s the fault of politicians that nothing is getting cut.

    A new Rasmussen Reports national telephone and online survey finds that 77% of Likely U.S. Voters think politicians’ unwillingness to reduce government spending is more to blame for the size of the federal deficit than taxpayers’ unwillingness to pay more in taxes. Fourteen percent (14%) think taxpayers are more to blame for the size of the deficit. (To see survey question wording, click here.)

    (Want a free daily e-mail update? If it's in the news, it's in our polls). Rasmussen Reports updates are also available on Twitter or Facebook.

    The survey of 1,000 Likely Voters was conducted on February 11-12, 2018 by Rasmussen Reports. The margin of sampling error is +/- 3 percentage points with a 95% level of confidence. Field work for all Rasmussen Reports surveys is conducted by Pulse Opinion Research, LLC. See methodology.

  • 32% Say FBI Director Must Go

    Most voters continue to view the embattled Federal Bureau of Investigation favorably and aren’t ready to fire the FBI’s boss because of its failure to act on warning signs about the Florida school shooter.

    The latest Rasmussen Reports national telephone and online survey finds that 32% of Likely U.S. Voters think FBI Director Christopher Wray should resign or be fired because of the agency’s failure to act on tips alerting them beforehand to the shooter who killed 17 last week. Just over half (52%) disagree, but 16% are undecided. (To see survey question wording, click here.)

    (Want a free daily e-mail update? If it's in the news, it's in our polls). Rasmussen Reports updates are also available on Twitter or Facebook.

    The survey of 1,000 Likely U.S. Voters was conducted on February 19-20, 2018 by Rasmussen Reports. The margin of sampling error is +/- 3 percentage points with a 95% level of confidence. Field work for all Rasmussen Reports surveys is conducted by Pulse Opinion Research, LLC. See methodology.

  • Support High for Trump's Infrastructure Plan

    President Trump’s plan to fix the nation’s ailing infrastructure calls for generating $1.5 trillion in upgrades through ventures involving the federal government, state government and private industry. Most voters support the proposal, and among those voters, most like the idea of finding outside sources to help fund it.

    A new Rasmussen Reports national telephone and online survey finds that 65% of Likely U.S. Voters favor Trump’s major plan to improve America’s infrastructure, including highways, bridges and tunnels. Seventeen percent (17%) oppose the plan, while 18% are not sure. (To see survey question wording, click here.)

    (Want a free daily e-mail update? If it's in the news, it's in our polls). Rasmussen Reports updates are also available on Twitter or Facebook.

    The survey of 1,000 Likely U.S. Voters was conducted on February 13-14, 2018 by Rasmussen Reports. The margin of sampling error is +/- 3 percentage points with a 95% level of confidence. Field work for all Rasmussen Reports surveys is conducted by Pulse Opinion Research, LLC. See methodology.

  • Voters Don’t Think Congress Will Fix the Big Problems

    Most voters continue to believe the Republican-led Congress is doing a poor job, perhaps in part because they lack faith that lawmakers  will do anything about the biggest issues facing the country.

    A new Rasmussen Reports national telephone and online survey finds that just 15% of Likely U.S. Voters now think Congress is doing a good or excellent job. That’s up just slightly from 13% in November and ties July’s finding, but is significantly lower than the 11-year high of 25% reached a year ago. Fifty-four percent (54%) now think Congress is doing a poor job, virtually unchanged from the previous survey. (To see survey question wording, click here.)

    (Want a free daily email update? If it's in the news, it's in our polls). Rasmussen Reports updates are also available on Twitter or Facebook.

    The survey of 1,000 Likely Voters was conducted on February 13-14, 2018 by Rasmussen Reports. The margin of sampling error is +/- 3 percentage points with a 95% level of confidence. Field work for all Rasmussen Reports surveys is conducted by Pulse Opinion Research, LLC. See methodology.